By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN
Reporter
CLIFTON —
With nearly 12,000
students attending the 42
Catholic schools in the Paterson
Diocese, educators and teachers
consider it a privilege that they
have 12,000 opportunities to
build Christ-centered lives in to-
day’s secular environment.
Catholic schools provide young
people with a strong foundation in the
Catholic faith in addition to offering stu-
dents a high-quality education.
Because of this, Partners in
Faith, the diocese’s capital and
endowment campaign, will sup-
port diocesan Catholic schools
as one of its missions to en-
hance and strengthen the
Church. In addition to Catholic
education, Partners in Faith will
assist Catholic Charities agen-
cies and social justice outreach-
es, aid parishes, help to repair
St. John the Baptist Cathedral in Paterson
and support the health care needs of priests.
Holy Cross Brother William Dygert, dioce-
san superintendent of schools, said, “The
mission of Catholic schools is to pass on the
faith. Catholic schools are one of the best
and most privileged platforms we have for
the evangelization of youth. Our last two
popes and the United States bishops always
emphasize that Catholic schools are the jew-
el of the American Church.”
At St. Brendan School here, with 325 stu-
dents from the city and neighboring com-
munities, such as Paterson and Passaic, that
environment of creating Christian citizens
and scholars occurs daily. Serving the school
as principal is Father Peter Clarke, who said,
Catholic schools are one of the key ways
the Church can live out its mission of evan-
gelization in its communities. We have a
dual role here — ensuring our students
achieve high academic standards and build-
ing a deeper relationship with the Church
within our children.”
In a unique role as a priest and a prin-
cipal, Father Clarke sees it as important min-
istry. “The children see a priest every day
and I consider it a privilege to serve at a
Catholic school and help the mission of the
Church daily. I spent five years serving at
DePaul Catholic High School (in Wayne)
and I still have students contacting me
whether it is for a college recommendation
letter or for prayers because a family mem-
ber died. A connection has been formed,”
said Father Clarke.
On the secondary education level, Father
Philip Michael Tangorra, chaplain and
teacher at DePaul Catholic High School and
chaplain at William Paterson University in
Wayne, said, “Priests serve as witnesses to
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St. Kateri marks
25
th anniversary
10-11
By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN
Reporter
PATERSON —
It has been more than two
years since parishioners have been able to
walk through the doors of St. Michael
Church here following its closure early in
2011
due to safety concerns with the 85-
year-old church building.
Now as the renovations near completion,
the church building will welcome back
parishioners to attend Mass again. To mark
the grand reopening of St. Michael Church,
Bishop Serratelli will be the principal cele-
brant of a Mass at 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29,
on the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel.
The Mass to celebrate the reopening of
the church will coincide with the 110th an-
niversary of St. Michael the Archangel Parish.
A dinner/dance will follow Mass in the
church hall. Vocationist Father Rijo Johnson,
pastor of St. Michael’s and also St. Gerard
Parish in Paterson since 2010, said, “God
hears our prayers. I came to St. Michael’s
three years ago and one of my first jobs as
pastor was having to tell the people we are
closing the church building. At times, it felt
hopeless but the community has remained
strong and dedicated to St. Michael’s.”
The church building, which is a nation-
al historic landmark, has strong roots in the
heart of “Silk City.” It began as a parish for
Italian immigrants as a mission of the
Cathedral of St. John the Baptist here and
today has grown to serve many families of
all cultures especially Hispanics living in the
area of Cianci Street.
Rebeca Ruiz-Ulloa, diocesan architect, has
been overseeing the work done at the church
since she recommended that it be closed for
safety reasons in 2011. Part of the challenge
in making extensive repairs to the church
was keeping the building’s integrity. “We’ve
done the best we can to match the original
architecture of this historic building. Many
of the materials used were no longer avail-
able such as the brick on the façade of the
towers. We definitely came close to the orig-
inal. The church is looking beautiful,” said
Ruiz-Ulloa
About 60 percent of the renovation work
has been completed – the north tower of the
building is finished and now the south tow-
er is undergoing needed repairs.
Because of the major work and these dif-
St. Michael’s Church to hold
grand reopening, celebrate
110
th anniversary Sunday
See
Landmark
on
Page 2
Catholic schools enhance Church’s evangelization mission
RENOVATION NEARS COMPLETION —
The north tower of St. Michael Church in
Paterson is shown as workers completed renovations to it. The church building has
been undergoing repairs to its exterior and interior for the past two years. St. Michael
Church will mark its grand reopening Sept. 29 and also the parish’s 110th anniversary
at a Mass that Bishop Serratelli will celebrate at 5 p.m. on Sunday.
See
Partners in Faith
on
Page 8
DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS
4
VATICAN II SERIES IS PART
OF NEWTON PARISH’S
YEAR OF FAITH ACTIVITIES
7
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD FOR
CSE AND ACADEMY OF ST.
ELIZABETH DEDICATED
17
SISTER SOPHIA MARIE IS
DIOCESE’S NEW ASSISTANT
CATECHECTICAL DIRECTOR
Outreach,
training
programs
listed for
center
15
W
HAT
T
O
D
O
14-15
Y
OUTH
6-7-9
V
IEWPOINT
12-13
R
ETREATS
&
S
HRINES
16-17
O
BITUARIES
8
C
LASSIFIEDS
18-19
H
ISTORIC
L
ANDMARK
IN
P
ATERSON
Enhances the learning environment
for students through a Catholic Schools
Matching Gift Endowment. Schools will
be eligible to apply for a grant from this
endowment for up to 50 percent of the
cost of local school improvements, such
as program planning, capital upgrades
or extraordinary building maintenance.
Promotes priests as leaders in edu-
cation in schools. Through the Priest
Catholic School Education Endowment,
clergy will find the financial support to
earn advanced degrees and secure lead-
ership positions in Catholic Schools.
Melds the best of the old and new
through the Great Classics Program.
This initiative will bring works of great
literature that have informed Catholic
tradition to students via a web-based
study program. Monies raised will en-
able diocesan school staff to develop,
implement and disseminate this faith-
strengthening program to students in
junior high and high schools, with the
goal of expanding it to other grades in
the future.
How PIF supports Catholic education